Category Archives: Pet Loss Resources

Pet Loss Support Hotline

Pet Loss Suppport HotlineWe have provided as much information on pet loss and the grief recovery process throughout Pet Memorial Urns Online as we could as well as provided a number of books on pet loss including the instantly available ebook How to ROAR: Pet Loss Grief Recovery by Robin Jean Brown, however you may feel that you still need further immediate assistance for dealing with the loss of your pet.

As a result we have compiled a list of toll-free pet loss hotline support group numbers based on your country of origin. Each of these support group hotlines are staffed by caring and understanding individuals who can further help you work through your grief and loss as well as provide immediate comfort.

Pet Loss Hotline United States

(800)565-1526 – Staffed by University of California-Davis veterinary students; weekdays, 6:30 pm to 9:30 pm, Pacific Time (PT).

(888)ISU-PLSH (888-478-7574) – Pet Loss Support Hotline hosted by the Iowa State University College of Veterinary Medicine. Operational seven days a week, 6pm to 9pm (CST) from Sept-April; Monday, Wednesday, Friday from 6:00-9:00 pm (CST) from May-August.

(877)394-2273 (CARE) – Staffed by University of Illinois veterinary students. Sunday, Tuesday and Thursday evenings 7-9 pm Central Time.

(866)266-8635 – Staffed by Washington State University College of Veterinary Medicine students who have been trained in grief counseling by a licensed therapist.

Pet Loss Hotline Canada

(866)226-8079 Ext. 55 – Staffed by Angie Rupra, R.S.W courtesy of Pet Vet Hospitals.

(888)332-7738 – Iams Pet Loss Support line from Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Non Toll Free (519)824-4120 Ext. 53694 – Staffed by a group of University of Guelph students who are trained to listen and support you through your grief Tuesday – Thursday 6:00 pm -9:00 pm ET.

We will be frequently updating this list of pet loss hotline support numbers as we become aware of new resources. If you know of a pet loss support hotline that we have not listed, please consider either commenting below with the number or use the contact us link to send us a message and let us know. We will add any new information during our next update.

Books On Pet Loss

Books On Pet Loss Although we have provided a great deal of information on pet loss and grief recovery you may still need further resources, and we have found one of the best books on pet loss to be by Robin Jean Brown the author of How to ROAR: Pet Loss Grief Recovery. It has seen tremendous success in softcover, and as a special offer to the Pet Memorial Urns Online network we can extend to you the downloadable ebook format courtesy of Robin Jean Brown herself, so that you can get the help you need right now, instantly.

Robin Jean Brown understands firsthand the deep bond that can develop between a person and an animal. She is not a cold psychologist, but a pet owner who had to deal with the death of her own beloved pet in April 2005 after her pet experienced a long and painful ordeal with brain cancer. When searching for help for grief recovery she found that there wasn’t any that worked for her. The other books on pet loss were either too cold and clinical, or far too sad to finish reading. Another thing she discovered, was that none of them had workbook-style questions to help guide her through her journey from grief to recovery. As a result Robin wrote a guide herself, which will help you deal with grief, effectively and step by step.

Robin is a personal, empathetic, and comforting person that will take you by the hand and lead you through all five stages of grief. How to ROAR: Pet Loss Grief Recovery, is not something that’s passive, where you just read about other people. Instead you will find exercises and self-help activities that will help you work through your pain. Every chapter has Journaling Questions that will validate the sorrow that you’re feeling, as Robin leads you to create your own unique story of you and your beloved pet.

If you want instant help to get you through the turmoil, sadness and tears then How to ROAR: Pet Loss Grief Recovery is for you and you can begin reading it within the next minute.

If you prefer to receive the softcover version of one of the best books on pet loss available, you will find it featured below along with a number of other excellent books on pet loss that may also be suited to your needs.

I Wasn't Ready to Say Goodbye: Surviving, Coping and Healing After the Sudden Death of a Loved One


I Wasn't Ready to Say Goodbye: Surviving, Coping and Healing After the Sudden Death of a Loved One

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The grief books that just "gets it".Each year about eight million Americans suffer the unexpected death of a loved one. For those who face the challenges of sudden death, the classic guide I Wasn't Ready to Say Goodbye offers a comforting hand to hold, written by two authors who have experienced it firsthand...

The Grief Recovery Handbook for Pet Loss


The Grief Recovery Handbook for Pet Loss

A very specific guide to the actions that help grieving pet owners grieve and complete their relationship to the pain and unfinished emotional business caused by the death of a pet.

How to ROAR: Pet Loss Grief Recovery


How to ROAR: Pet Loss Grief Recovery

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Robin Jean Brown understands firsthand the deep bond that can develop between person and animal. She's not some cold psychologist, but rather a pet owner herself who dealt with her own painful journey through the grieving process...

Missing Pieces...Broken Heart: A Recovery Guide for the Grief and Sorrow of Pet Loss


Missing Pieces...Broken Heart: A Recovery Guide for the Grief and Sorrow of Pet Loss

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Your pet is your special friend and cherished companion. Dealing with their loss or impending loss can prove painful beyond imagining.B.J. Shonk has been there, and she's ready to help guide you through the grieving process with wisdom, compassion, and insight...

Healing Grief, Finding Peace: 101 Ways to Cope with the Death of Your Loved One


Healing Grief, Finding Peace: 101 Ways to Cope with the Death of Your Loved One

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"Dr. LaGrand's advice and recommendations reach from and to both heart and head...a powerful and important lesson about grief: that even in grief, we can still grow." ―Kenneth J. Doka, PhD, senior consultant, Hospice Foundation of AmericaWhether the death of a loved one is sudden or follows a long battle with illness, there is no way to prepare for the loss of someone close...

Cold Noses At The Pearly Gates: A Book of Hope for Those Who Have Lost a Pet


Cold Noses At The Pearly Gates: A Book of Hope for Those Who Have Lost a Pet

Do all dogs and cats really go to heaven? Yes, they do! The death of your beloved pet can be one of the most heartbreaking losses you'll ever endure. But recovery isn't only about closure. You also want to know where your best friend has gone...

Going Home: Finding Peace When Pets Die


Going Home: Finding Peace When Pets Die

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In this invaluable guide and touchstone, New York Times bestselling author Jon Katz addresses the difficult but necessary topic of saying goodbye to a beloved pet. Drawing on personal experiences, stories from fellow pet owners, and philosophical reflections, Katz provides support for those in mourning...

I Wasn't Ready to Say Goodbye, 2nd Ed.: A Companion Workbook


I Wasn't Ready to Say Goodbye, 2nd Ed.: A Companion Workbook

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Based on the bereavement classic I Wasn't Ready to Say Goodbye, this workbook of healing and hope offers step―by―step support and encouragement through the grief journey.Called a "support group in your hands" by professionals and mourners alike, I Wasn't Ready to Say Goodbye Workbook acts as a warm touchstone to navigate the unique emotions and challenges of grief in the wake of a sudden loss...



Telling Children About Loss Of A Pet

Telling Children About Loss Of A PetSometimes children or adolescents cannot remember life without the pet that was just lost and for them the loss may be extremely difficult to deal with, and telling children about loss of a pet can be difficult for the parents. If this is the case, then talking to a professional experienced in grief counselling may be needed. It is important to keep in mind that this does not mean that the parent has failed to provide the support that the child required either. Professionals or support groups, pet loss hotlines, or books on pet loss specialize in the behaviour that a child might exhibit at the loss of a pet, and can help them deal with the loss faster than a parent can, which is important for their well being.

Many factors can contribute to how a child will feel when they lose a pet or when telling children about loss of a pet. Their age and maturity are important, because just like older people, the relationship the child had with the pet, the circumstances of the pet’s death, and other events or losses the child has experienced will influence the grieving process. The ability of parents and others to provide pet loss support will also play an important role in helping the child work through the grief.

The following maps out how a child may respond to the loss of a pet, dependant on the age of the child.

If you have an infant or child of up to two years old, they may not understand the death or loss of a pet, but are aware of tension and change in the emotional state of those around them. Reassuring them by hugging and holding them, and keeping a similar household routine helps.

When toddlers or pre-school children are involved, they may not understand that death is permanent or absolute. They will need help in understanding the pet will not wake up or come back to them. Do not try to hide the pet’s illness or death because they are often the first to sense that something is wrong. Trying to isolate them is also not a good idea because they may experience emotions that include abandonment or betrayal, and it also takes away their ability to say good-bye to the pet. Reassure them that it is okay to ask questions and feel sad because even children as young as two years old can experience feelings of grief and sorrow. Attempting to hide the loss that an adult feels about the death of a pet may result in a child feeling no one would care if they died as well.

Young children are sometimes unable to express their feelings and act out instead. They may display bursts of anger or aggression or start displaying regressive behaviour such as bed wetting, thumb sucking or even complain of not feeling well. They may even start to experience severe separation anxiety, or may even think it was something they did or thought that caused their pet to die, and blame themselves. Even if a child has not come right out and said it, it is helpful to let them know that they were not responsible for the death of the pet.

If the decision was to euthanize the pet, explain to the child that it is a painless injection of medication, which allows the pet to die and not suffer any further. It should also be made clear that the injection that the pet receives is not like the shot they themselves receive from a doctor. It is also a personal family choice and age dependant whether or not to have the child present during the procedure, but you can also choose to have the child enter them room immediately afterwards instead. Do not explain euthanization as “put to sleep” because young children may become confused and start to exhibit signs of fear of falling asleep themselves immediately afterwards. They may think they will not wake up or become terrified in the future if they are told they are going to be put to sleep before a required surgery or at the dentist.

When a child is grade school age, they normally understand the concept of death either through education, personal experience, or experience of their friends, and know that it is permanent. They usually ask a number of questions about how and or why the pet died and a parent should answer all of them to put their mind at ease. A child over the age of 12 may have a very difficult time recovering from the grief, and may not be open about how much emotional pain they are experiencing. The reason they exhibit this behaviour is because they do not want to be perceived as weak, and are able to deal with the loss of a pet similar to way they think an adult can. Adolescents should not be put in the position of having to take on extra responsibilities such as caring for siblings during this time of crisis.

If at all possible, prepare the child ahead of time for the death. Mementos and memorials can be very important for children to recover from the grief process. Even an informal memorial service can provide a child with the opportunity to say a final goodbye and they should always be able to participate in any arrangements that their might be. If the pet is to be buried, the child should be given the option to be there because if it is done without the child’s knowledge it can make the entire grieving process more difficult for them, and make the child less trusting of his parents at a time when he really needs them. If you are going to keep the pet’s ashes, then the child should be given the choice of helping to choose from available pet urns.

Support at this time from parents, family and friends is important for children of any age, and will assist in helping the child work through grief. If you need further information there are a number of books on pet loss that are specifically written about telling children about loss of a pet and we have included a selection of some of the best in that section of Pet Memorial Urns Online.

Dealing With A Pet Death

Dealing With A Pet DeathThe grief process is different for everyone and can last for days, months or even years, and is perfectly normal when dealing with a pet death. The process sometimes begins with denial until the pet owner can accept the loss. Some pet owners feel anger, which may be directed at anyone involved with the pet, including family, friends, and veterinarians, and they may also feel a sense of guilt about what they did or did not do for the pet, which can delay coming to terms with true feelings and the loss of the pet.

Sorrow and sadness is the stage we normally think of as grief. For many pet owners, losing a pet may be one of the most heart breaking experiences they will ever have. Mourning the loss, and finding it difficult to eat, sleep or even concentrate on tasks that were once considered simple or easy is not uncommon. Another symptom is becoming withdrawn from other people, but this is really when we need supportive people the most. Talking to someone else who understands the grief of losing a pet is an important step in helping the healing process begin.

When these first stages subside the resolution stage of the grieving process can begin. It is at this point that the pet owner will begin to finally accept the reality of their loss and remember their pet with less sadness. The pet owner will start focusing on the wonderful memories and the times enjoyed together with their pet. There may still be times or events that will trigger the pet owner to experience sadness, anger or guilt but the recovery time will be much quicker. It has also has been shown that when grief is outwardly expressed, the time needed for healing is far less lengthy.

While the grief process is really a unique personal experience, a pet owner still not need to face the loss alone. There are a number of forms of pet loss support available including Pet Memorial Urns Online itself as well as other internet based websites. We strongly recommend that you post your comments or experiences within any section of this site so that others that are experiencing the grief of pet loss will know that they are not the only ones. You may even find a supportive friend or two.

Other forms of support that are available are the pet loss support hotlines we have compiled for quick reference as well as a number of excellent books on pet loss that help with dealing with a pet death.